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Research Studies

There are many opportunities for families to participate in autism research. You can join a clinical trial, enroll in a research study, or participate online by adding your family information to a research database. 90% of children with cancer are enrolled in clinical trials, but only 5% of children with autism currently participate in research. Your participation will make a big difference.

Listed here are many opportunities to get involved in research in the New England area.  Read about the studies here, contact researchers directly with questions or for more information, subscribe to get updates on any or all of the studies.

 

September 9, 2014
Project TEAM Study Looking for Teens and Young Adults Ages 14-21 with Developmental Disabilities

Dr. Jessica M. Kramer, PhD, OTR/L

Location: Boston University


Teens and young adults with developmental disabilities want to participate in a variety of activities, but sometimes things in the environment get in the way and make it hard. People, places, information, and rules are some examples of parts of your “environment.” Dr. Jessica Kramer at Boston University is studying how teens and young adults... Read more

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Tags: 10 to 18; Over 18; Boston Medical Center/Boston University; Cognition and Behavior;

July 9, 2014
Visual Perception in ASD

Caroline Robertson and Nancy Kanwisher

Location: Massachusetts Institute of Technology


How does your brain group visual information? How does attention change how you see? We would like to invite you to participate in our research project investigating visual perception in people with Autism Spectrum Conditions.

Who is invited to participate?

To participate in this study, you must be 16 years of age or older, have a diagnosis of... Read more

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Tags: 10 to 18; Over 18; MIT; Brain imaging studies;

May 30, 2014
Emotional Face Processing Research Study

Rhiannon Luyster, PhD

Location: Boston Children's Hospital


The ability to perceive and identify emotions in faces is crucial to navigating our social world and it is often difficult for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Our research team at Boston Children’s Hospital aims to shed light on specific areas of strength and difficulty for individuals with ASD. By learning more about how... Read more

1 Comments

Tags: 10 to 18; Over 18; Children’s Hospital Boston; Cognition and Behavior;

March 25, 2014
Social Behavior and Cognition Study

Lianne Young, PhD

Location: Boston College

The psychology laboratory of Dr. Liane Young in Boston College is looking for participants ages 18-35 with autism spectrum disorders for a study that will help us understand how people perceive and think about social interactions.

Participants will be screened by email for fMRI eligibility based on the following requirements:

March 5, 2014
ACE study of adolescents with ASD

Helen Tager-Flusberg, PhD, Robert Joseph, PhD, Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, PhD, Frank Guenther, PhD, Dara Manoach, PhD

Location: Boston University and Massachusetts General Hospital

The Boston University Autism Center of Excellence is recruiting adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who are between 14 and 21 years of age for a study investigating why some children with ASD do not develop spoken language.  Adolescents without spoken language and adolescents who are verbal are eligible for this study.

Participation... Read more

3 Comments

Tags: 10 to 18; Boston Medical Center/Boston University; MGH;

January 29, 2014
TSC and ASD study

Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD

Location: Boston Children's Hospital


The Computational Radiology Lab at Boston Children’s Hospital Needs:

TSC and/or ASD Patients!
Between the Ages of 5 and 10 years old

For a Brain Imaging Research Study to Identify Brain Changes in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Purpose

We believe that the insight that we gain from studying and... Read more

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Tags: 5 to 10; Children’s Hospital Boston; Brain imaging studies;

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